About Evan Carroll

Evan Carroll is an author, speaker and UX strategist who works to make digital experiences more personal, more emotional and more effective. A leader in the developing digital legacy and personal archiving arena, Evan is author and co-founder at The Digital Beyond and co-author of the book, Your Digital Afterlife: When Facebook, Flickr and Twitter Are Your Estate, What's Your Legacy?. Evan has appeared in numerous media outlets including The New York Times, NPR’s Fresh AirObit magazine, NPR’s Here and Now, Fox News, CNN and The Atlantic. A frequent speaker on both marketing and digital legacy, Evan has presented to audiences at SXSW Interactive (2010-2012, 2014), the Library of Congress, and the Internet Archive, among others. Evan holds BS and MS degrees in Information Science from UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Information and Library Science. He can be contacted by emailing or via Twitter @evancarroll.  Evan's personal site is www.evancarroll.net.

Author Archive | Evan Carroll

How Much Are Your Digital Assets Worth? About $35,000.

McAfee recently released the results of a global digital assets survey and our digital devices hold an estimated $35,000 of value on average. Topping the charts are irreplaceable personal memories, photos and videos, at an estimated $17,065 in value. Additionally, 55% of respondents expressed they kept assets on their devices that are impossible to recreate, download or purchase again.

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Deceased Man Returns on Facebook

Harry Friar died a year ago, but now he’s sending our friend requests on Facebook. FOX Carolinas reports that the South Carolina man appears to be sending friend requests, however they’re from a new account created by someone else to look like Mr. Friar’s actual account.

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ULC Approves Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act

At its annual meeting in Seattle the Uniform Laws Commission approved the work of its Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets committee on July 16th.

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What Happens to Your Online Presence When You Die? [Infographic]

Here’s a great infographic from WebpageFX that shows what happens to popular online accounts when you die.

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What happens to your LinkedIn account when you die?

LinkedIn offers the ability to close the account and remove the profile of a deceased user. In their Help Center, they offer this explanation: Unfortunately, there may be a time when you come across the profile of a colleague, classmate, or loved one who has passed away. If this happens, we can close that person’s account and remove their profile on your behalf.

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93 Percent of Americans Unaware or Misinformed About Digital Assets

A CBS News Poll, conducted by telephone from April 16-20, 2014 among 1,017 adults nationwide, concluded that 40 percent of Americans sampled had created a will. Not surprisingly, age plays a factor. Among those 18-49 years of age only 22 percent have a will, rising to 62 percent for those 50 and older. By comparison, A Harris Poll from March 2013 doesn’t indicate much change, finding that 39% of Americans had a will.

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Giving Up Control Helps People Enjoy Large Photo Collections

New research from Carnegie Mellon University and Microsoft Research reveals that in a world of ubiquitous access to massive personal photo collections, we may enjoy them more if we give up control and exercise patience.

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Everplans Secures $2.075m Second Seed Funding Round

Is the digital afterlife industry heating up? Perhaps so. Last week Everplans secured $2.075 million in a second round of seed funding, bringing their total seed funding to $3.45 million to date, including a first seed round of $1.375 million that closed in June 2013. Of course, we’ve seen signs of a developing industry for a few […]

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Infographic: Preparing for Your Digital Afterlife

This infographic from WhoIsHostingThis.com provides a great, quick overview of how various companies, including Google, Twitter and Facebook handle your accounts once you’re gone.

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WebCease Helps Heirs Find Forgotten Accounts

Previously I’ve mentioned the need to solve the digital afterlife problem in a way that does not require advance planning. WebCease, a new service that finds and reports various digital accounts after the account holder has passed, does just that. The premise is actually quite simple. An executor or heir pays WebCease to research the […]

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